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they have a lot in common with the people of the gulf coast who suffered through katrina in 2005. the sheer size and scope of the destruction from hurricane sandy stretches for hundreds of miles, from the jersey shore, to long island. this was a big storm, and has brought a significant part of the country to its knees. >> look at this line! it goes back -- this line goes six miles. look at this! >> reporter: with power still out to millions of people, one of the biggest daily concerns has become gasoline. some lines at stations that still have gas stretched for blocks. tempers of the drivers in those lines frayed. and police have even been called in to patrol the lines to keep the peace. >> i need to run my taxi too. >> reporter: there were some signs of meaningful progress. in new york city, more train and subway service was added. all told, the electricity is back on for more than 4 million homes and businesses across the northeast. >> oh, my god! >> reporter: this evening, the lights came back on in new york's greenwich village, something worth celebrating. and all but two of atlantic ci
, and that would make sandy among the most expensive. hurricane katrina, the price tag $108 billion. yes, and that was just in money terms, not in people terms. >> right now, we are going to go back to baltimore. are things getting worse? >> things are getting worse. people have been talking about this storm. is worse than it was last year, with i read, for example. we are dealing with some really cold temperatures. not only with the reagan, looking at the rain falling at a lamppost, i will tell you what. these winds have continued to pick up in the last hour. i want to give you a bit of detail. 311 is fully operational. they are asking you to call 311 if you have a cottage. -- an outage. we have got 2000 police officers. also, swift water rescue is in place. we do know that these conditions are going to get worse. we also know that housing inspectors are out and about. wherever you are right now, do not try to go anywhere. six shelters in baltimore city. the rain is starting to come down. we will continue to monitor things. >> thank you. >> the use of 911 versus 311. the mayor had remin
to be thrown out. and you will hear the memory of katrina more and more in the coming days. like katrina, three days out, we're still learning about places receiving very little help and attention, like staten island, ann curry has more. >> reporr: brian, good evening to you, that is right, the outrage boiled over here in staten island, because more than three days after the hurricane here, people from the close-knit community, accused them of responding much slower here than to the richer parts of the city. >> every single person on this block lost everything. >> reporter: staten island has had enough. >> we just want everyone to know that we are hurting down here and we need help, immediately. >> reporter: residents here are asking why hasn't more help arrived? >> i think we're not getting more attention, because we are a working class neighborhood. and it is kind of like fend for yourself kind of thing. >> reporter: on the streets hit with debris, where the death toll has gone up to at least 19, today, the fury was seen live on television. >> but you need to come here and help us, we need he
comparisons to katrina, there's a reason for it. things are starting to look and feel like a deep, long-haul disaster. the grisly business of finding bodies, the daily realization that the face of the earth has changed, especially along the jersey shore. this is the new contour of the jersey shore. and right where we are is the borderline between two towns which have been in the news, bayhead to the north. six miles down is seaside heights, new jersey, almost impossible to see what's left of the ferris wheel and the amusement tower. from seaside heights, new jersey, this is what we found on the beach, one of the 57 chevy replicas that was part of the ride. the ocean gave this quite a ride. but just pause and think about the number of 4 and 5-year-olds who got their first thrill on a carnival ride at the beach right in this front seat with the safety bar down to protect them. there are two kinds of damage along the jersey shore. these are the first pictures taken from beach level of some of the fanciest sections. one of these houses was valued at $13 million the day before the storm arri
katrina are inspiring one high school to come to the aid of hurricane sandy victims. help is on the way. that is the message being sent by airline high students and faculty. the group is on a mission to send this semi-trailer stocked with canned food, blankets, and other helpful items to the atlantic coast where it will be much appreciated. >>> i'm lynn berry. this is "early today," just your first stop of the day today on your nbc station. >> good morning. we are starting out in the 40's, so it is pretty chilly. we still have some wins wrapping around what is left of sandy. 43, and looking at the radar picture, that is what is left of sandy. not a major concern for the northeast. a few of those could make their way into the western part of our state. we will continue to talk about this and when we get to the forecast. >> the time is at 4:56. , we have the latest on hurricane sandeep. >> what people are doing to climb out of the damage caused by hurricane sandy. >> emergency responders will get some help from baltimore city. >> still dealing with a few closures around the area. [ female
katrina. >> troops and heavy equipment continued to move into the strike zone. >> the tattered road to recovery, and littered with debris. >> every single person on this block lost everything. >> crews are clearing away what they can. supplies and support are pouring in, but there is not enough to meet the overwhelming need. >> this is not something that is going to be over until long time. >> charging stations provide survivors with a lifeline. the subway in new york is slowly coming back online. as officials race to get ready for the marathon this weekend, some are frustrated saying it is too soon and the waste of valuable resources. >> the city of new york is talking about getting water out of the battery tonneau. and preparing for a marathon. do you see that disconnect? >> in some of the hardest-hit communities, the water may be anger ut the residents' is still rising. >> the views show what could've happened to us. look at the widespread damage. she got a chance to see the devastation around her family's vacation home. parts of the area are just unrecognizable. >> this was plan
're certainly there. that's the kind of work that we do. we did it during katrina and rita back in the '05-'06 time frame as you know. our emergency response crews are ready to go. we have teams staged and our emergency response center is staffed here at norwell. you know, we expect over the next, you know, 24-48 hours to be activated and help and deal with any kind of issue that our clients have out there. >> let's talk about your acquisition of safety clean. i have a piece in my hand, august 9, 2012, credit suisse, somewhat negative piece about your company saying it's more cyclical and tied into the oil and gas business than we realize. listen, it's too levered to that cycle. safety clean acquisition changes the whole rationale against owning clean harbors, doesn't it? >> well, i think it does. it's $1.4 billion revenues of environmental service work. it's going to work nicely into our disposal assets. safety clean really is a leader in three areas. the leader in handling small quantities of waste generated by a number of industries out there. over 200,000 different customers out there.
orleans during katrina. this is the coldest hurricane. typically you get wet during a hurricane but you're not cold like you during a snowstorm. the today we're getting both. water blowing into your jacket. we're getting creative on how to stay warm out here. we are talking to larry williams who has been generous letting us stay on his property all day. thanks for coming back with us, larry. at this point, you have been out here all day. what is your take on this storm and how you eventually think it is going to impact you here? >> i'm very relieved. with the winds the way they have blown all day long coming out of the west, it has kind of pushed the water out, which is what we like to see. unfortunately it does impact other people. after going through isabel, i couldn't ask for a better storm. >> that is a saying a lot because of the conditions that you're enduring here. you got your boat out of the water. your home was leveled pretty much by isabel. at this point what can you do? stay up and ride it out and take a look at what happens? >> actually i think -- i would not say we're safe
or on your house some way so we know where you are. very reminiscent of what we saw in katrina. the good news is the vast majority of people who were told to evacuate did evacuate so you didn't have as many trapped people, as you might have expected, had they not done so. two people dead and one man who is still believed to be missing. savannah? >> katy tur in stonington, connecticut this morning. thank you. >> let's go to al roker on point pleasant beach along the jersey shore. al, what's the weather like there, first of all? >> it's still windy, matt, and we're getting bands of rain. let me show you something down philadelphia avenue. you see there's a lot of flooding, and folks walking through that standing water. do not do that. because you don't know what's in there. from a biohazard standpoint, from a debris standpoint, from live wires. there was a woman electrocuted in new york city walking through a puddle. do not do that. so -- but, again, we are talking about the remnants of sandy still hanging around for at least another 24 to 36 hour. as we take a look at the "today" map, in the n
the woman with her three dogs and we've seen this before, al, hurricane katrina, for example, people risked their own lives because they didn't want to leave their pets behind. >> and first responders taking that just as responsibly and as important as rescuing any human. because they're so important. they become parts of the family. >> exactly. and we don't know how many dogs and cats and other pets have been taken into shelters, but meredith was on earlier mentioning the aspca and other organizations have stepped up to help. that dog's like, thank you, sir, thank you. i don't need any bacon bits or anything. >> look at that. >> hey, we also want to remind you, tonight's rock center with brian williams will be completely devoted to the recovery from sandy. you can watch it 10:00/9:00 central right here on nbc. >> incredible lineup there. and just ahead, kathie lee and hoda, but first, your local news and weather.
and unwater the city of new orleans after hurricane katrina. >> many others have been dispatched from illinois to share what they learned from katrina several years ago. >> reporter: how much water do we need to pump out? >> our estimates at this point in time are 300 to 400 million gallons of water. and it's growing. >> reporter: and even though there's not as much overall as there was in new orleans, he says the job in new york is much more difficult. >> it's not the amount of water that's the problem, it's where it is. >> it's where it is, yeah. >> and where it is is underground in miles and miles of subway and road tunnels. >> some of those tunnels are up to 2 miles long. and the only points into them is at each end. and that requires us to have some pumping capabilities that perhaps reach 1/2 mile to a mile long. >> another problem, the age of the tunnels. new york's subway system is over 100 years old. >> some places we could probably pump out quicker, but we don't want to collapse the tunnel. >> the next challenge, where to pump all that water. >> largely mostly sea water. right now we'
. katrina, $100 billion, again, took a long time to rebuild what. i would say is the initial impact is very, very bad, but when the federal government gets involved, waves its wand, and when the insurers pay, you tend to have a very quick rebound that can actually help, if it's huge enough, the gross domestic product of the united states. >> i want toƩ@ focus in on tha not to be intencenssensitive to people are dealing with, but there are serb sectors of the economy that will benefit. i would assume the construction industry, to start with one. >> yes. hurricane andrew in 1992, the construction industry boomed. the lumber industry boomed. glass. a lot of companies simply had to send everything down to florida, and that raised the praise across the board throughout the united states. highly unusual. that was pretty much the only time that i've seen the gross national product really jump off of a hurricane. this could be like that. that's how big this one might end up being. >> and very quickly, i'm sure you had heard rumors, reports that potentially the federal government would have to del
billion. making it the fourth costliest disaster behind katrina, 9/11 and andrew. >>> homeowners may be spared a costly deductible. >>> and business is about to boom for companies that made oprah's annual favorite things list. we always love this one. a few of your favs, an $1800 battery and peddle powered bike, microsoft's new $500 surface tablet and a $40 blue velvet cake. blue velvet. just ahead, bill karins is going to have your weekend weather forecast, plus how one family in eastern pennsylvania is making the best of being without power. you're watching "early today." >>> well, welcome back. we'll get into your weekend forecast starting with today. no big storms across the country. nice and calm and mild in the southern half of the country. little chilly up along minneapolis, chicago and all across the northeast. little bit of moisture begins to increase in texas with some showers maybe even into tennessee and arkansas. nothing too bad. as we go through sunday, everything still pretty much the same. it's really, lynn, not until we get into tuesday and wednesday. not a huge one,
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13

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